Buddhism and Gender: From Mythology to the Present

By Helena Jordheim | February 21, 2020 Known as Shakyamuni Buddha or Siddhārtha Gautama, the Buddha lived during the 400s BCE, and in that lifetime reached enlightenment, or nirvana. But even before the Buddha attained this title, he lived hundreds of previous lives which were recorded as part of the Buddhist texts. In the Buddhist … Continue reading Buddhism and Gender: From Mythology to the Present

China’s Investment in Africa: Genuine Aid or Concealed Imperialism?

By Palden Lhamo | February 21, 2020 Africa’s relationship with the international community in terms of the dynamics of dependency and aid is not subject to frequent media attention. However, it is imperative that it should be highlighted upon. In this essay, the two referenced Economist articles discuss the growing surge of interest in diplomatic … Continue reading China’s Investment in Africa: Genuine Aid or Concealed Imperialism?

The Political Consequences of Neoclassical Economic Theory: A Close Look at the Minimum Wage

By Bee Kinstle | February 21, 2020 The Minimum Wage Debate and the Failures of Neoclassical Economic Theory Neoclassical economic theory can be found in most Economics 101 courses at nearly every higher education institution worldwide. The study of exclusively neoclassical economic theory can, and does, lead students into a circular style of thinking where … Continue reading The Political Consequences of Neoclassical Economic Theory: A Close Look at the Minimum Wage

Longing for Lebanon: The Question of Nostalgia and Memory of the Long 1950’s

By Sharon Arana | May 2, 2019 Picture: An armed Palestinian celebrating the rout of the Phlanagist, posing in front of a poster of President Nasser with Arabic graffiti writing on the wall that translates to “the socialist union was here.” Throughout the Middle East, the long 1950’s have been hailed as the period most … Continue reading Longing for Lebanon: The Question of Nostalgia and Memory of the Long 1950’s

The North Korean Refugee Crisis and Neighboring Countries’ Policy Response

By Wanyi Liu | May 2, 2019 There is a special group of migrants from North Korea who have received surprisingly little attention on the world stage. These marginalized people are North Korean refugees who, for years, have fled, most often in the face of the ongoing food shortage that began with North Korea’s 1999 … Continue reading The North Korean Refugee Crisis and Neighboring Countries’ Policy Response

A Comparative Analysis of Neoclassical Economics and Law and Political Economy: Views on Institutional Foundations as a Means to Economic Development

By Mohamed Camara | December 4, 2018 The Law and Political Economy tradition, like the New Institutional Economy, agrees that institutions lead to economic development because markets are regulated by institutions, or, “humanly devised constraints that structure human interactions.”1 The Law and Political Economy tradition, like the New Institutional Economy, agrees that institutions lead to economic development … Continue reading A Comparative Analysis of Neoclassical Economics and Law and Political Economy: Views on Institutional Foundations as a Means to Economic Development

The Importance of an Apolitical Central Bank

By Nicholas Torres | December 4, 2018 Introduction A central bank, put simply, is the institution within a country that manages that country’s currency, money supply, and interest rates. These three factors have a profound influence on the broader economy. Therefore, the function of a central bank is something to take seriously. However, there has … Continue reading The Importance of an Apolitical Central Bank

Israel, Palestine, and the Use of Psychological Force

By David Levin | December 4, 2018 Culturally Palestinian and cartographically Israeli, the West Bank is a present focal point of Israeli settlement and military occupation, signifying decades of apartheid and violence that manifests in the infrastructure of the land.1 Israeli settlements cut between and divide Palestinian territory, establishing strategic positioning for the construction of … Continue reading Israel, Palestine, and the Use of Psychological Force

From Blue to Red: An Evaluation of the Evolution of the Democracy of the Turkish Republic

By Mina Erten | Art: Gradient of Democracy by Manya Tam | December 11, 2017 A downfall of humankind is that no matter the amount of forewarning, we are creatures that learn best through experience and identifying the problem and its consequences with the self. If this were not true, then politics in the 21st … Continue reading From Blue to Red: An Evaluation of the Evolution of the Democracy of the Turkish Republic